7.27.2006

http://www.pagat.com/trumps/watten.html

glorious german card game watten found looking for the watten johnson correpsondance

7.25.2006

yet another graphic design / artist site with a gallery and a manifesto

http://www.compactspace.com

APPLIED CREATIVITY AND THE INTERFACES OF VISUAL CULTURE
01 Mass communication is altering and deviating our true perception of reality and reflects an alienation within our society.

communication alters perception; the urge to commuticate itself signals a distance, difference, or "alienation" one being to another

02 Today’s public spaces are overwhelmed by mass communication, blinding viewers to art’s aesthetic and function.

today's public "spaces" are increasingly ones of structured and moderated (owned, operated) communication rather than physical space, or within physical space

03 Experience and entertainment have become the guidelines for our visual culture.

as opposed to -- what? utility to what end?

04 An Interface is a mutually transforming encounter between people and cultures that leaves nothing as it was before.

not my defn.

back to digging in my yeard

05 The interfaces of our current visual culture have the same relation to responsibility as Disney World to reality.

disney just fired its pres., and appointed a man who is coming from consumer products, where (after star wars) more money is made than the films themselves

so what is it about these objects -- sentiment/ a signal that creates a memory of entertainment, a fantasy-totem?

06 We need fundamental changes and modifications to our current interfacing system in order to engage in the shaping of a more authentic and livable world.
07 Awareness and responsibility stand before conceptualization and must induce a deeper examination and questioning of current world issues.
08 Interfaces must start a dialogue that draws attention to critical issues by both surprising and disturbing the ordinary and promoting awareness and responsibility.
09 Contemporary art must infiltrate the interfaces of our visual culture.
10 Contemporary art and mass communication must combine their skills and responsibilities.
11 Applied Creativity is the advanced combination of art and communication, a fusion which creates solutions, originates new possibilities and provides alternatives for our visual culture.
12 Applied Creativity requires the transmission of cultural criticism through artistic activities.
13 Applied Creativity must supply information and content that will lead to beneficial dialogues within an alternative inter-visual global culture.
14 The practice of applied creativity will not simply create critical tools with which to negotiate a changed contemporary world, it will re-conceptualize the manner in which such tools are implemented.

"If you lived here you'd be home by now"
curated by Eve Fowler

July 29th-August 19th
Opening Reception July 29th, 7-10pm

compact/space Gallery
1307 South Union
Los Angeles, CA 90015
www.compactspace.com
lax@compactspace.com

compact/space is pleased to announce If you lived here, you’d be home by
now, an exhibition of photographs, paintings, video and live installation
by Ian James, Cathy Kim, Glenna Jennings, Meghann McCrory and Chelsea
Molnar and Charchi Stinson curated by Eve Fowler.

Collapsed homes, scary bushes, rock-throwing sessions, ESL lessons and
ex-lover baseball cards abound in this group show about how humans try to
leave evidence of their respective passages through space and time. The
artists observe and/or create their own architectural realities, which are
ultimately rendered uninhabitable for public, personal or physical
reasons.

Ian James' recent work provides documents of minor acts of physical
change. Rocks tossed from cliff sides and holes clipped in fencing attempt
to alleviate the personal anxiety that can result from the powerless
nature of existence.

The sculptural work of Cathy Kim involves the replication of spaces within
the context of memory. For this show, Kim has re-created compact/space
itself to investigate the possibilities of surveilling both the false and
the obvious.

Meghann McCrory also investigates the concept of surveillance, taking a
different perspective on her previous work involving fictionalized
landscapes. McCrory offers evidence of institutional-like worlds that
evoke the subtle fear and tension pervasive in our own everyday existence.

Glenna Jennings presents documentation and a live ‘language booth’ for her
project “Free Serbian Lessons,” which investigates the value of the
useless. Also, try your luck at the grab bag “Ex-Lover or Balkan War
Criminal?,” in which Jennings has re-contextualized her past relationships
with Serbs as collectible sports cards.

Chelsea Molnar’s drawings mesh actual collapsed homes with LA landscapes.
These depictions stem from Molnar’s interest in nature’s impact on the
urban landscape. Though symbols of wealth and power, the structures come
to represent human’s inability to foresee potential disaster.

The empty institutional spaces which Charchi Stinson photographs provide a
subtle critique of the manner in which architecture shapes our behaviors.
The uninhabited and un-homey spaces still bear the intangible presence of
those who have utilized their functions and services.