9.24.2010

Sacramento Poetry Center
Presents

Mark Statman and Kurt Brown
Mon. Sept. 24 at 7:30 PM
Crossroads for the Arts
1719 25th Street
Sacramento, CA

Mark Statman's writing has appeared in numerous publications including Tin House, Hanging Loose, Cincinnati Review, Trespass, The Hat, Bayou, Conduit, Subtropics, The Florida Review, Ping Pong, and American Poetry Review. His work has been featured on Poetry Daily, as well as The Bob Edwards Show, The Leonard Lopate Show, and PBS' New York Voices. His most recent books are the poetry collection Tourist at a Miracle (Hanging Loose, 2010) and with Pablo Medina a translation of Federico Garcia Lorca's Poeta en Nueva York (Poet in New York) [Grove, 2008]. Other books include Listener in the Snow (Teachers & Writers, 2000), and with Christian McEwen The Alphabet of the Trees: a Guide to Nature Writing (Teachers & Writers, 2000). His essays, poetry, and translations have appeared in nine other anthologies. He is currently at work on a translation on the selected works of Jose Marie Hinojosa. A recipient of awards from the National Endownment for the Arts and the National Writers Project, Statman is an associate professor of literary studies at Eugene Lang College of The New School where he teaches courses on Spanish surrealism and the art of sports.

Kurt Brown was born in Brooklyn, New York, and grew up on Long Island and in Connecticut where he attended the University of Connecticut. He spent many years in Aspen, Colorado where he founded the Aspen Writers' Conference and edited the Aspen Anthology. His poems have appeared in many periodicals, including Ontario Review, Massachusetts Review, Crazyhorse, and Southern Poetry Review. Kurt has edited several anthologies: Drive, They Said: Poems about Americans and Their Cars (Milkweed Editions), Verse and Universe: Poems about Science and Mathematics (Milkweed Editions), Night Out: Poems About Hotels, Motels, Restaurants and Bars [co-edited with Laure-Anne Bosselaar] (Milkweed Editions). His latest anthology is called The Measured Word: On Poetry and Science (Univ. of Georgia Press, 2001). Kurt's first book of poems, Return of the Prodigals, was published in April, 1999 by Four Way Books, and his latest is No Other Paradise (Red Hen Press, 2010).

SPC members now receive a special 10% discount on all UC Davis Extension writing courses!
Note: This is an unadvertised discount and SPC members must self-identify for it to be applied. At this time, discounts are not available when enrolling "and paying" online; we recommend that SPC members enroll by phone at (800) 752-0881. In addition, discounts must be applied when enrolling and cannot be combined or applied retroactively.

October 4 [Bob]: American River Review reading
Oct. 6 [Bob]: 4 Poets Laureate: Connie Post, Dennis Schmitz, Allegra Silberstein, Ronna Leon. {Sacramento Room}
October 9: SPC Presentation at Crocker
October 11 [Emmanuel] Ron Slate and Christopher Mlalazi
October 18 [Rebecca] Poetry Reading in memory of Pearl Stein Selinsky. Featured readers include: JoAnn Anglin, Nancy Wallace, Jeanine Stevens, Ann Privateer, Mary ellen burns, Lisa Bert, Carol Louise Moon, Maggie Frost, Joe & Susan Finkelman, Jennifer Pickering, Melen Lunn, Allegra Silberstein, and Tom Goff.
October 21 [Mary Zeppa and Lawrence Dinkins] Brown Bag Poetry at the Central Library, 828 I Street, 12 noon
October 21: Confluence at Natsoulas Gallery in Davis
October 29: Stories on Stage: Angie Chau and Alex Dezen
October 25 [Tim] Graham Foust and Matthew Zapruder and Michael Earl Craig

9.20.2010

Stephen Dunn
A Circus of Needs
Carnegie Mellon, 1978

I was pleasantly surprised, cracking this open on the way to mailing it out. What this book has going for it that I don't find as clearly in many contemporary lyric narrative collections of its ilk is that the poems in this easily convert: i.e., "The Man Who Never Loses His Balance" isn't a hypothetical aerialist, and isn't only Dunn. It is both, and not as mawkishly so as I had begun to remember, reading more current poems like this.

While other poems compare perhaps less favorable with those of Diane Di Prima (A Capitalist Love Letter to her Revolutionary Love Letters) or to Robert Haas' FIELD GUIDE POEMS....

A message from the time the third person could be used rather than the "I", and have all the benefits of that distance, none of the limits of the "I" but a ghost of it, an illusion/conjuring. Why is the third person so illigitimate now?