1.04.2011

THURSDAY, JANUARY 6

CLMP & SPD have arranged the following program:

Session 60. Roundtable on Poets Theater
1:45-3:00pm, Plaza III, J.W. Marriott
Presiding: Patrick F. Durgin, School of the Art Inst. of Chicago; Kevin Killian, California Coll. of the Arts
Speakers: Sarah T. Bay-Cheng, Univ. at Buffalo, State Univ. of New York; Heidi R. Bean, Bridgewater State Coll.; Fiona Templeton, Brunel Univ.; Rodrigo Toscano, Labor Inst.

FRIDAY, JANUARY 7

Session 403. The Grand Piano, An Experiment in Collective Autobiography: A Reading and Discussion
Friday, January 7, 7:00–8:15 P.M., 407, LA Convention Center

Presiding: Hélène Aji, Université Paris-Nanterre
Speakers: Rae Armantrout, Univ. of California, San Diego; Antoine Cazé, Université Paris-Diderot; Carla Harryman, Eastern Michigan U.; Lyn Hejinian, Univ. of California, Berkeley; Ted Pearson, Univ. of Redlands; Kit Robinson, Berkeley, Calif.; Barrett Watten, Wayne State U.

SATURDAY, JANUARY 8

In support of the Grand Piano panel, SPD is having our first book signing & wine event at the MLA:

Grand Piano Book Signing & Wine Reception
4:30–5:15 P.M., Booth 425, Concourse Hall, LA Convention Center

Flyer: http://www.english.wayne.edu/fac_pages/ewatten/pdfs/gp10spdevents.pdf

And, for the grand finale, we hope to see you at the big group reading:

Poster: http://www.spdbooks.org/images/tnjpeg/MLA_reading_poster.jpg

1.03.2011

I wonder, though, how revising different sorts of poems is different? For example, revising a poem with meter and rhyme must certainly be different from rewriting a lyric narrative in free verse, from improving a poem in an innovative format?

Length strikes me as a difference too -- short vs. 1-3 pages vs long vs. book length?

Thinking about this today: there seems to me to be a number of ways and means hiding under "revision" (to see again):

editing (in Pat's note full of great tips, "proofreading" -- but it is more than that -- there's also usage, concision, mot juste, tone, timing, space, of punctuation, line breaks and other pauses, syntax, words, grammatical structure; there's -- outside of narrative, logic...

revision, audition, overhearing (see my comments a while back)

rewriting, reworking...

This last -- because we continue whatever it is we're doing in ways that have a history -- how do you work on things differently, depending on their source, relationship to you, to the world?

a thing that came from notes (and are those overheard from other people? bits of thoughts?) versus research (notes from...)

sui generis

a promising squib from practice in craft
(which I crabbily distinguish from)
a promising squib from a "poetry exercise"

????
I wonder, though, how revising different sorts of poems is different? For example, revising a poem with meter and rhyme must certainly be different from rewriting a lyric narrative in free verse, from improving a poem in an innovative format?

Length strikes me as a difference too -- short vs. 1-3 pages vs long vs. book length?

Thinking about this today: there seems to me to be a number of ways and means hiding under "revision" (to see again):

editing (in Pat's note full of great tips, "proofreading" -- but it is more than that -- there's also usage, concision, mot juste, tone, timing, space, of punctuation, line breaks and other pauses, syntax, words, grammatical structure; there's -- outside of narrative, logic...

revision, audition, overhearing (see my comments a while back)

rewriting, reworking...

This last -- because we continue whatever it is we're doing in ways that have a history -- how do you work on things differently, depending on their source, relationship to you, to the world?

a thing that came from notes (and are those overheard from other people? bits of thoughts?) versus research (notes from...)

sui generis

a promising squib from practice in craft
(which I crabbily distinguish from)
a promising squib from a "poetry exercise"

????