3.27.2010

Feminaissance: Los Angeles Party Today

Join Les Figues Press and LACE in celebrating Women¹s History Month and the
release of Feminaissance :
a book of tiny revolts.

LACE (Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions)
6522 Hollywood Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90028
4:00-6:00 p.m.

With Readings By:
MAGGIE NELSON
WANDA COLEMAN
CHRISTINE WERTHEIM
STEPHANIE YOUNG
MEILING CHENG
VANESSA PLACE
and TERESA CARMODY

Feminaissance : A Book of
Tiny Revolts.
Edited by Christine Wertheim, with contributions from: Dodie Bellamy,
Caroline Bergvall, Meiling Cheng, Wanda Coleman, Bhanu Kapil, Chris Kraus,
Susan McCabe, Tracie Morris, Eileen Myles, Maggie Nelson, Juliana Spahr,
Vanessa Place, Christine Wertheim, Stephanie Young and Lidia Yuknavitch.
Report from the opening of an art show:

"Something With Women..." at New Puppy Gallery in L.A.

3.11.2010

I thought that -- due to the utter lack of proximate parking -- I'd arrived not an hour late, in time for the first band, but an hour too late to the opening of the show. Nope! Still being hung when I walked in and no line for drinks. Or indeed, any dancing or a crush to see the pictures. I had time to look around.

My first question was women-themed works by women? just works by women? who happen to frequently mine women's themes (whatever those might be?)?

Too bad the card with power tools wasn't an installation.

You know, labels really do help, especially when there's no "map" in a group show. So I will try to do my own. Starting to the left of the entrance, Barbara Maloutas, also the curator, has presented (I think) her family names as "word clouds" printed in black, large format. These are on the exterior wall of the "texty" small room on the left entrance. Family names, largely erased for women, concern with family. The word clouds like maps, in a sense, without the same hierarchy (although there is a certain one: font size, distance of word from center our outside of cloud).

In side the small "text room," again moving from the left were Larkin Higgins' text works -- as well as a very Jess-like (but really interesting to my eye) collage. On the wall opposite were some color phots mounted to cardboard, with a single collage element on each photo. The over all -- and successful insofar as it reached -- effect was of those Baroque-to-Victorian era etchings of internal organs that pictured women, fully clothed with windows that "open" into the interior. Here the collage elements forst, by color, seemed internal, but on closer examination, were a "transport" away from the limbs and appendanges (legs and hands) of the background images.

The corner curio had chaps for donation to the ACS and a breast cancer theme -- on fabric cut with pinking shears.

The next small space had works with an illustrative quality, by turns early Warhol/Hollywood Regency era 60's fashion illustration (Paris, poodles, pink strip... etc.), more of a Beardsley updated sort, and a vintage 40s vixen with war planes, but herself marked with plane markings as those were tattoos (the planes of that era being commonly painted with vixens, not v/v).

On another wall of this same space were some color-prints-of-brushstrokes, of the sort of appearance I'm a sucker for -- a three dimensional quality to them. There were also two contractions/collages of the neighborhood around the gallery with found paper (stamps, gum wrappers, etc.) -- nice but I'm curious; a mother child project? Seemed to have elements of that. Or by someone who'd grown up in the neighborhood?

After that, in the next small room, I particularly liked the furniture ("domestic objects"), well chosen: magazine rack, plant stand, tabletop with lips and eyes as from a fashion illustration, self portrait and "topless" self portrait, respectively, drawn (and perhaps fired) on.

I'm shopping the photos for now.

OK, now I realize the curator is dropping blue folders that contain artist name post-its around. Labels to come.

Doubling back, the breast cancer corner also has a series of slides -- on topic but also an allusion to Eleanor Antin's "Blood of a Poet."

The outside wall of the last space on the left, the one with the tabletop, now faces into the large room containing an all female atonal / improvisational bank WITH AN OBOE. On it is a color field painting: gloss dark teal, glitter pink stripe, mauve fringe, and matte brown. I think the fringe is plastic and that I would like it better as fringed (cut) canvas painted that color.

There is more and more and it is still the children's hour at the space. I feel I should go -- I have -- seen it, but can't really comment more yet....

3.26.2010

If you love Chopin's music and poetry, mark your calendar for two events celebrating the publication of "Chopin with Cherries" - on April 11 at South Pasadena Library Auditorium and on May 8 at the Ruskin Art Club. There will be poets, pianists, poetry, music, music boxes, and a polonaise lesson at the end!
Details are below and the pdf flyers are attached for your convenience.
Maja Trochimczyk

Chopin with Cherries I: An Evening of Music and Poetry
Sunday, April 11, 2010, at 6 p.m.
South Pasadena Library Auditorium, 1115 El Centro Street,
South Pasadena, CA 91030. Free Admission.

Presenting works by 30 poets (20 poets will read their work in person) and Chopin’s music played by special guest artist, pianist Dr. Neil Galanter and students of Prof. Roza Yoder from Pacific Azusa University. Also including interludes with Chopin music boxes.
Poets include: Millicent Borges Accardi, Lia Brooks, Victor Contoski, Beata Pozniak Daniels, Emily Fragos, Helen Graziano, John Z. Guzlowski, Laura Haskins, Elizabeth Hiscox, Marlene Hitt, Rebeca Hoffmann, Laura Mays Hoopes, Lois P. Jones, Amy Lowell, Rick Lupert, Radomir Luza, Mira Mataric, Elizabeth Murawski, Linda Nemec Foster, Ruth Nolan, Dean Pasch, Nils Petersen, Susan Rogers, Marylin N. Robertson, Russell Salamon, Kathi Stafford, Maja Trochimczyk, Erika Wilk, Martin Willitts, Jr. , and Kath Abela Wilson.
Dr. Neil Galanter will play: Polonaise in C-sharp Minor, Op. 26 No. 1, Nocturne in F-sharp Major, Op 15. No. 2, Prelude in D-flat Major, Op. 28, No. 15 (“Raindrop”), Mazurka in A minor, Op. 17, No. 4; Mazurka in C Major, Op. 24, No. 1, and Impromptu in F-sharp Major, Op. 36
Students of Prof. Roza Yoder from Azusa Pacific University will play a selection of Chopin’s waltzes, nocturnes, mazurkas, preludes and etudes.
Chopin with Cherries: A Tribute in Verse volume is a celebration of the 200th birth anniversary of a Polish pianist-composer, Fryderyk Chopin (1810-1849) with 123 poems by 92 poets, mostly based in America. The highlights are the first English translation of Norwid's Fortepian Szopena by Leonard Kress, works by T.S. Eliot, Emma Lazarus, and Amy Lowell, and a number of award-winning poets, including Emily Fragos, Jeffrey Levine, Ruth Nolan, Marie Lecrivain, Rick Lupert, Lois P. Jones, Charles Adés Fishman, John Z. Guzlowski, Linda Nemec Foster and many others.
Poetry published in Chopin with Cherries: A Tribute in Verse, an anthology of poetry edited by Maja Trochimczyk. Los Angeles: Moonrise Press, 2010. ISBN 978-0-9819693-0-5. Available from www.lulu.com and coming soon from Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Borders, etc.
Note: “This activity is not sponsored by the City of South Pasadena or the South Pasadena Public Library”

Chopin with Cherries II: An Evening of Music and Poetry
Saturday, May 8, 2010, at 7 p.m.
Ruskin Art Club, 800 South Plymouth St.
Los Angeles, CA 90005
www.ruskinartclub.org

Suggested donation: $10.00
Presenting works by 30 poets (20 poets will read their work in person) and Chopin’s music played by internationally acclaimed pianist, Prof. Wojciech Kocyan (Loyola Marymount University). Also including a polonaise lesson by Polish choreographer Edward Hoffman, artistic director of Krakusy.
Poets include guests Gretchen Fletcher, Donna Emerson, Marian Kaplun Shapiro, Leonore Wilson (coming to LA especially for this event), Los Angeles area poets and others: Millicent Borges Accardi, Kerri Buckley, Beata Pozniak Daniels, Jessica Day, Lori Desrosiers, David Ellis, Emily Fragos, Marlene Hitt, Rebeca Hoffmann, Laura Mays Hoopes, Gloria Jones-Davis, Emma Lazarus, Marie Lecrivain, Jeffrey Levine, Radomir Luza, Mira Mataric, Ryan McLellan, Ruth Nolan, Susan Rogers, Alison Ross, Russell Salamon, Kathi Stafford, Taoli Ambika Talwar, Maja Trochimczyk, Erika Wilk, Meg Withers, and Kath Abela Wilson.
Chopin with Cherries: A Tribute in Verse volume is a celebration of the 200th birth anniversary of a Polish pianist-composer, Fryderyk Chopin (1810-1849) with 123 poems by 92 poets, mostly based in America. The highlights are the first English translation of Norwid's epic Fortepian Szopena by Leonard Kress, classic works by T.S. Eliot, Emma Lazarus, and Amy Lowell, and verse by a number of contemporary, award-winning poets, including Donna Emerson, Emily Fragos, Charles Adés Fishman, John Z. Guzlowski, Lola Haskins, Jeffrey Levine, Ruth Nolan, Marie Lecrivain, Rick Lupert, Linda Nemec Foster, Katrin Talbot, and many others.
Poetry published in Chopin with Cherries: A Tribute in Verse, an anthology of poetry edited by Maja Trochimczyk. Los Angeles: Moonrise Press, 2010. ISBN 978-0-9819693-0-5. Available from www.lulu.com and coming soon from Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Borders, etc.
www.moonrisepress.com/chopin.html
Paperback Edition - $23.00 or
PDF Download - $8.00

3.25.2010

writing to Sharon on wompo about series vs. sequence

At the time I began writing them, and when we had this discussion on
WOMPO first, which I think was about 10 years ago, I relied heavily on
the princeton encyclopedia for developing my ideas.

Now it is in an inconvenient place and I have been writing said poems
for a long time, and it strikes me that manuscripts and projects are
converging -- with -- both.

I tend to think of series as more from the same idea, about the same
thing, from the same source, approaching something from every
conceivable direction. A series about ... rather than a television
series. Which, oddly, when someone says "too episodic" they are
referring to the sequence of events being too much like tv. Ah well.
I tend to think of sequences being something that allows the writer's
thinking and form to approach, to change, to develop, over the course
of writing, more than a series, which seems an exhaustion of
possibilities than a development of them.