2.05.2009

Sanqu - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Sanqu - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
are cliches used differently in different genres?

well, the example of cole porter points out: they are used differently by different lyricists

many lyricists use cliches or twists on cliches for effect

another thing is that if the "new" cliche is coming from film and song (make my day, etc. -- not coming from tv -- partially this is because films are marketed using catch phrases and tag lines and trailer moments), the writer of the would - be cliche is motivated to write the would - be cliche

at the same time that, perhaps, one has to wonder: what about cliches in poetry, then

if verse plays and poems (the well turned phrase, never so well said) were originally the source of cliche, but now the more ubiquitous media (and most lucrative to write) are now cliche mines

also -- and I think probably like never before the last 50 years -- we have sonic cliches -- riffs, solos; we have visual cliches, gags, whole scenes and situations: we are all attuned to the hackneyed, the overused, the easy

and some of us are suckers for it, and some of us find humor in it, perhaps more humor in twists on these "idiot savant commonplaces" than in new things ("ring of truth/familiarity"), and some of us don't

roses are red, violets are blue, hand me the potato chips
roses are red, violets are blue, hand me the potatoe chips

roses are red, violets are blue, your eyes are brown, send in the clowns

2.04.2009

cliches in pop songs

the problem is, work from the cliches or songs?

these have a relationship to mondegreens, although I think a more sophisticated one to language, in the sense that cliches -- from onomonotepia or however that is spelled -- in the source of the label "cliche") (I like to think of the suck sound from decanning canned refriend beans) -- are from poems and into lyric and then misunderstood as mondegreens -- a sort of reverse o.

heart of stone
heart of gold
heat of the moment

knock on wood

heart in the right place

lock stock ... and teardrops
lock stock ... and two smoking barrels

shit hits the fan

ships pass in the night

ON A ROLL

one night stand

oince bitten twice shy

[actually, is there a cliche that is not a rock lyric????]
LMU EXTENSION SPRING POETRY SERIES

http://extension.lmu.edu (310) 338-1971
for more information and directions

FEBRUARY 12, 2009

Features + limited open - sign-up at 7:45
University Hall, 1 LMU Drive, Suite 1859

BEN TRIGG
&
GEDDA ILVES

Hosted by Peggy Dobreer

Ben Trigg is the co-host of Two Idiots Peddling Poetry at the Ugly Mug Caffé in Orange. As a host, he works to remind people that poetry is often fun, sometimes silly. When not at the Ugly Mug, Ben uses his BA in drama to work in educational research. He performs throughout California, parts of the Northeastern U.S., and in Texas with the Austin International Poetry Festival. His first full length collection Kindness from a Dark God came out on Moon Tide Press in 2007, and he is included in So Luminous The Wildflowers and Blue Arc West anthologies. Ben was one of the organizers of the first Orange County Poetry Festival in 2002, as well as subsequent festivals.


“He revealed in you a holiness
only his eyes could comprehend.
“Eyes to drown in,” you said,
leading to a place of understanding
where breath was currency.
Eyes so deep you grew gills,
left behind those of us who couldn’t swim.” -Ben Trigg, excerpt from Wet


Gedda Ilves was born in Harbin, North China, of Russian descent. She lived in Shanghai during WWII and then imigrated with her late husband via Brazil to Los Angeles in January 1951. She published her first book of poems Grains of Life in 2005. Her work has appeared in Poetic Voices, The Rag, Gentle Strength Quarterly, and two anthologies. Her second book of poems, A View From Within, was published in Spring 2008.


“he plunges into the blue water,
it burns, his tongue
sticks to his mouth

salty ocean waves
sweep over him

he struggles to get up, it’s dusk
visible on the bare floor
remnants of a spilled
white powder.” -Gedda Ilves, excerpt from Solipsism





Peggy DoBreer

Peggy Dobreer | Community Relations Coordinator | LMU Extension | Loyola Marymount University
University Hall | One LMU Drive, Suite 1840 | Los Angeles, CA 90045-2659
T: 310.338.1971 | F: 310.338.2706
from a post to spidertangle (from a convo. of them) I hope to pursue these ideas this way

according to the english language definitions, mathematic + al = of the nature of mathematics

I'm merely pointing out that mathematics is a symbolic language that is written, that describes; by limiting it to arithmetic as simile and metaphor, you are limiting the many ways that it can (and does) become literature. For example, mathematical terminology often comes from plain language but takes on different meanings: and, or, is, equivalent, limit, union, conjunction, set, series, sequence, empty. Then my previous examples of analysis, functions, mathematical theory...

Arithmetic and metaphor are rudimentary tools; not to say a would be writer can't or shouldn't use them, or that they are bad, or that I don't; I just prefer more sophisticated literary techne.

The reason I think this is so important is that in science or technology -- springing from math -- there is a lot of overlapping confusion from this underlying math and literature confusion. Mathematics can also be a humanities study, and so it can relate to literature as, say, history does.

Visual poetry, like performance poetry, by contrast, can embrace the possibility of becoming literature, (visual) art, or both.

2.03.2009

Event: Agitprop Reading Series
"Vanessa Place & Teresa Carmody, Saturday 2/7, 7pm"
What: Performance
Host: K. Lorraine Graham & James Meetze
Start Time: Saturday, February 7 at 7:00pm
End Time: Saturday, February 7 at 8:00pm
Where: AGITPROP Gallery

2.02.2009

Watching Hogan's Heroes, Ron wikipedia-ed it

all actors playing germans (klink, schultz, etc.) were jewish; almost all were camp survivors who had family members (parents, etc.) who perished; many also served in the us army

didn't air on german tv until 92; was re-dubbed to have regional german accents (made funnier); german government tried to get it cancelled

"I see nothing!"