5.23.2009

Wayne Rogers of mASH fame produced and wrote Astro-Zombies AND is now a stockbroker

5.22.2009

ok, to post on this

Britons 'scared of reciting poetry'
19 hours ago
Britons are baffled by poetry, with many saying they live in fear of being asked to recite a poem in public, research has found.

first, to dismiss the hack lead in


Seven in 10 (73%) are "scared" by the genre, according to a poll of 1,500 adults, while two thirds (67%) admit reading and reciting poetry leave them tongue-tied.

...

On occasions when a recital is called for, such as a wedding or anniversary, more than six in 10 people (61%) say they dread being asked to perform. But more than two thirds of those questioned (67%) say they have put pen to paper to create their own verses.

the survey statistic leading into the tag line seems to be more about 1) public speaking, 2) being judged, in public, on quality of recitation/memorization -- perhaps of some weird thing forced-memorized at school 50 years ago

that the surveyed people had hazarded a love poem -- ah, yes, the idea behind one of my unoffered, but syllabized courses for ucla extension

--

More than eight in 10 (82%) say they cannot recite any poems by heart...

again, about memorization, not about poetry at all, though I think there is an emerging subtext that rhythm, meter, rhyme don't act alone as mnemonic devices: they just aren't as powerful as, say, in a purely oral culture AND HAVEN'T BEEN FOR A REALLY REALLY LONG TIME

The poll, conducted to mark the transmission of the BBC documentary Off by Heart, revealed that the older generation, those aged 60 and over, was more likely to know a poem by heart.

see -- this is about MEMORIZATION

Seven in 10 (72%) could remember the lines they learnt as a child, with Edward Lear's The Owl and The Pussycat and Wilfred Owen's war poem Dulce et Decorum Est among those that have stayed with them.

Daisy Goodwin, who produced the documentary and organised a national poetry competition for primary schools, said she was unsurprised by the findings.
She said: "It is almost entirely to do with teaching poetry in schools. Learning poetry by heart went out of fashion in the 1960s. Unless you learn poetry as a child you never get the taste for it."

the poll and doc is really about memorization and performance/public speaking

that the docmaker concluded that people not being forced to memorize rhyming pap in gradeschool leads to them not liking poetry is idiotic; she seems to have no clue about the actual content of her questions or the meaning of the results/footage/responses

what could have been interesting might have been how rhythm and rhyme aren't effective mnemonic devices, or why committing poems -- or much else, other than how to locate info, in this new era of to-hand information -- is desirable, especially when being forced to memorize bizarre texts removed from personal experience, emotion, or opinion, and then tested and graded on the result, has obviously turned off at least five generations to public speaking


makes me remember those bizarre speech/monologues our school used to have for "speech contests" and the ways we memorized and performed them for competitions -- they were typescripts -- some on yellow -- stapled onto 12 1/2 x 9 royal blue slightly heavier stock, such that the top 1/2 inch was folded over, and there were two staples holding the packet together

5.21.2009

I'm delighted to announce the release of the 12th issue of Galatea Resurrects. The issue can be accessed directly at http://galatearesurrection12.blogspot.com For convenience, I also reprint the Table of Contents below.


GALATEA RESURRECTS, ISSUE NO. 12
TABLE OF CONTENTS

May 20, 2009

EDITOR’S INTRODUCTION
By Eileen Tabios


NEW REVIEWS
Thomas Fink reviews 237 MORE REASONS TO HAVE SEX by Denise Duhamel & Sandy McIntosh

Kristin Berkey-Abbott reviews 237 MORE REASONS TO HAVE SEX by Denise Duhamel & Sandy McIntosh

John Herbert Cunningham reviews CONEY ISLAND OF THE MIND: 50TH ANNIVERSARY EDITION by Lawrence Ferlinghetti, ABOUT NOW: COLLECTED POEMS OF JOANNE KYGER by Joanne Kyger, and THE COLLECTED POEMS OF PHILIP WHALEN BY PHILIP WHALEN Edited by Michael Rothenberg

Nic Sebastian reviews HARLOT by Jill Alexander Essbaum

Tom Hibbard reviews ENDGAMES by Márton Koppány

Amber DiPietra reviews OCCUPATIONAL TREATMENT by Taylor Brady

Rebecca Guyon reviews MOONGARDEN by Anthony McCann

Angela Genusa reviews MAXIMUM GAGA by Lara Glenum

Eileen Tabios engages OBSOLETE—AN ALPHABET OF POEMS INSPIRED BY DEAD WORDS by Katie Haegele

John Herbert Cunningham reviews CONTEMPORARY POETICS edited by Louis Armand, PRIOR TO MEANING: THE PROTOSEMANTIC AND POETICS by Steve McCaffery, and PATAPHYSICS: THE POETICS OF AN IMAGINARY SPACE by Christian Bök

Tom Hibbard reviews FRAGILE REPLACEMENTS by William Allegrezza

Kristina Marie Darling reviews THE HOUSE IN THE HEART by Willie James King

Garrett Caples reviews MARTINIQUE: SNAKE CHARMER by André Breton

Michael Caylo-Baradi reviews HUMAN CATHEDRALS by John Sweet

Thomas Fink reviews HISTORY OF THE COMMON SCALE by Edward Foster

Eileen Tabios engages DISCLOSURE by Dana Teen Lomax

Fiona Sze-Lorrain reviews THE HEAVEN-SENT LEAF by Katy Lederer

Richard Lopez reviews ALL ROADS...BUT THIS ONE by Jon Cone, Claudie Grinnell, klipshutz and Albert Sgambati

John Bloomberg-Rissman reviews POEMS FOR THE MILLENIUM VOLUME THREE edited by Jerome Rothenberg and Jeffrey C Robinson

Eric Gelsinger reviews TIME MACHINE by Ric Boyer

Jeff Harrison reviews NOSERING CELLPHONE by Lanny Quarles

Jean Vengua engages KATA by James Maughn and KALI'S BLADE by Michelle Bautista

Nicole Mauro reviews [LAPSED INSEL WEARY] by Susana Gardner

Kathryn Stevenson reviews TINDERBOX LAWN by Carol Guess

John Herbert Cunningham reviews THE CAMBRIDGE INTRODUCTION TO MODERNISM by Pericles Lewis, THE CAMBRIDGE COMPANION TO MODERNIST POETRY edited by Alex Davis and Lee M. Jenkins, and THE CAMBRIDGE COMPANION TO POSTMODERNISM edited by Steven Connor

Steven Karl reviews THE STARS ON THE 7:18 PENN by Ana Bozicevic

James Stotts Engages TODAY I WROTE NOTHING: THE SELECTED WRITINGS OF DANIIL KHARMS, Edited and Translated by Matvei Yankelevich

Eric Gelsinger reviews LETTERHEAD VOLUME 2, Eds. Eric Johnt, Bradley Lastname, Brian McMahon, Robert Pomerhn

Eileen Tabios engages PORTRAIT AND DREAM: NEW AND SELECTED POEMS by Bill Berkson

Ching-In Chen reviews THE ALPS by Brandon Shimoda

Christopher Mulrooney reviews THE NEW YORK POSTCARD SONNETS by Philip Dacey

Fiona Sze-Lorrain reviews INVERSE SKY by John Isles

Nathan Logan reviews THE AMPUTEE´S GUIDE TO SEX by Jillian Weise

Grace C. Ocasio reviews HORSE PLAYING THE ACCORDION by Elizabeth Smither

Dave Bonta reviews TEN POEMS ABOUT HIGHWAYS AND BIRDS by Sarah Bennett

Eileen Tabios engages OPEN NIGHT by Aaron Lowinger

Richard Lopez reviews T(HERE) by Jonathan Hayes

Tom Beckett engages CADAVER DOGS by Rebecca Loudon

John Bloomberg-Rissman reviews 14 BOOKS from the 2008 LONDON SMALL PUBLISHERS FAIR

Jeff Harrison reviews INCONGRUITIES by Séamas Cain

John Herbert Cunningham reviews EMERALD ICE: SELECTED POEMS 1962-1987 by Diane Wakoski

Elizabeth Kate Switaj reviews SATELLITE CONVULSIONS: POEMS FROM TIN HOUSE, Edited by Brenda Shaugnessy and CJ Evans

Craig Santos Perez reviews RIVER ANTES by Myung Mi Kim

Denise Dooley reviews THE DRUG OF ART: SELECTED POEMS by IVAN BLATNY, Edited by Veronika Tuckerová

John Herbert Cunningham reviews LITERARY THEORY: A GUIDE FOR THE PERPLEXED by Mary Klages and THE CAMBRIDGE COMPANION TO FEMINIST LITERARY THEORY edited by Ellen Rooney

Ruth Lepson reviews HOUSECAT KUNG FU by Geoffrey Gatza

Angela Genusa reviews BARF MANIFESTO by Dodie Bellamy

William Allegrezza reviews DIPTYCHS: VISUAL POEMS by Nico Vassilakis

John M. Bennett reviews SUCURSAL DE ESTRELLA: POEMARIOS INICIALES Y FINALES by Alvaro Cardona Hine

John M. Bennett reviews LONGFELLOW MEMORANDA by Geof Huth

John M. Bennett review FROM THE ANNUAL RECORDS OF THE CLOUD APPRECIATION SOCIETY edited by Márton Koppány and Nico Vassilakis

Eileen Tabios engages LUNCH POEMS by Mark Young and DELTA BLUES by Skip Fox

Aileen Ibardaloza reviews THISTLES by Jack Cassinetto

Nathan Logan reviews THAT TINY INSANE VOLUPTUOUSNESS by Elisa Gabbert & Kathleen Rooney

Nicola Trumbull reviews NEVER CRY WOOF by Shafer Hall

James Stotts engages INSTANTS by Philip Metres

John Herbert Cunningham reviews GAYATRI SPIVAK: ETHICS, SUBALTERITY AND THE CRITIQUE OF POSTCOLONIAL REASON by Stephen Morton and GAYATRI CHAKRAVORTY SPIVAL: LIVE THEORY by Mark Sanders

Steven Karl reviews CLARITY AND OTHER POEMS by Thomas Fink

Helen Losse reviews FORMS OF INTERCESSION by Jayne Pupek

Steven Karl reviews LOST WORK BOOK W/ LETTERS TO DEER by Catherine Meng

Kristin Berkey-Abbott reviews A BIGGER BOAT: THE UNLIKELY SUCCESS OF THE ALBUQUERQUE POETRY SLAM SCENE edited by Susan McAllister, Don McIver, Mikaela Renz, and Daniel S. Solis

Steve Tills reviews THIS POEM/WHATSPEAKS?/ADAY by Tom Beckett

Ruth Lepson reviews (B)ITS by Joel Chace

Eileen Tabios engages PLAGIARISM/OUTSOURCE by Tan Lin


TAN LIN INTERVIEWED
by Chris Alexander, Kirsten Gallagher and Gordon Tapper, with interview edited by Gordon Tapper


THE CRITIC WRITES POEMS
Elizabeth Kate Switaj


FEATURED POET
Reb Livingston, interviewed by Tom Beckett


FROM OFFLINE TO ONLINE: REPRINTED REVIEWS
John Olson reviews COMPLICATIONS by Garrett Caples


ADVERTISEMENT
Tiny Poetry Books Feeding the World...Literally!

BACK COVER
Boy And Dog

5.20.2009

1. What drew you to editorial work in the first place?

It is de rigeur for the set of places that publish me to have to be an editor too.

2. Describe your editorial trajectory – when/where did it start, how long have you been at it, where is it now? What are your editorial ambitions?

I have edited and published a lot of technology stuff, a lot of my own stuff. There are some more presses doing what I want to do now, more than a few years ago when I started. That's good.

3. Apart from following submissions guidelines, what should a poet sending work do (or refrain from doing) to stay on your good side?

Buy a copy, know the mission, know me.

4. Do you co-edit or edit on your own? Talk about this choice – what are the pros and cons of both options, in your view?

I am it. My husband offered to support my press if I would devote more time to it, make it more professional, publish different fiction, by more men. I felt that since the press is a money loser and a time suck, I didn't want to devote more effort to it. I feel that while it is good to have these books that wouldn't be otherwise, or in this form, that delving any deeper would either be embittering, or involve a lot of pr I didn't care about.

5. What gets you most excited when you read a submission? How frequently do you get “exciting” submissions?

I get pretty exciting submissions

6. Describe how you sort through and narrow down submissions and finally select pieces for publication.

solicitation only

7. Is your publication online, print or hybrid? Share your thoughts on the differences between these formats from an editorial point of view. Does your publication accept both snail mail and email submissions? Explain your policy in this regard.

print only; there is/was some plan to do .pdfs

8. Talk about the challenges and opportunities involved in accepting or rejecting work submitted for publication by poets you know personally.

Well, as soon as I run into a problem, it stalls the whole process indefinitely. If it isn't the way I want it to be, I won't spend time or money on it, move it forward.

9. If you are a publishing poet, how does being an editor affect your performance/behavior as a poet? Do you ever publish your own work? If so, why? If not, why not?

I give my isbns to people who are going to publish me, so that as much work as possible is listed that way.

10. Describe how you conceptualize what you are trying to achieve with each edition. How do you get feedback on the quality of your publication?

the mission is "appealing to the eye and ear" and we try to do that different ways
what does a feminist poet look like, or locate a feminism in my work, or respond to Mark Wallace?

feminism is fairly simple; it is not a theory so much as a conviction

coming into a feminist consciousness is really (and even clear on delirious hem blog) realizing that the world contains no gender equity; equality, even equality under laws and many general cultural practices, is a radical idea. it exists almost nowhere. it is a tangible intangible. radical in the same was that peace is a radical idea and practice, one that doesn't necessarily disallow violence, for example

oh, if only the virginia presidential think tank had applied their radical ideas more thoroughly

even among feminists, though, to be a female feminist is to have a different vision of the need and application of feminism -- radical gender equality -- than to be male

in the same way, african american people have different visions of radical racial equality than do latin@s than do caucasians

while ideas live differently in different cultures, equality is not necessarily a cultural idea/value; its thorough application would involve a change in culture, and as an idea, it might arise or live differently in different cultures, sure
abductive reasoning from wiki

Deduction
allows deriving b as a consequence of a.
are the assumptions true? if so, the conclusions (validly arrived at) are true

Induction
Induction is inferring probable antecedents as a result of observing multiple consequents. Induction is modern algebra to deductive arithmetic.

Abduction
allows inferring a as an explanation of b or precondition a to be inferred from the consequence b. there are multiple possible explanations for b.

abduction can produce results that are incorrect within its formal system. Hence the conclusions of abduction can only be made valid by separately checking them
but when something is known about the likelihood of different causes for b, a, abduction

i.e. Aliens? Or just a bad souffle?
and this blog is a google product

http://www.googlebooksettlement.com

I opted out for my book and my press

on the one hand, there is some OLD research which indicated that online publication did not really negatively impact print copy sales of a title

on the other hand, there is my current practice, which is to say that WITH VERY STRANGE LIMITS AND CAVEATS google books is making the public domain books I work with accessible, so much so that not being affiliated with a university LIBRARY is not quite so punishing as formerly, and even some exerpts of articles and critical works are enough for me to get the leads (if not citations) I need, especially now that the LAPL is not purchasing new poetry or critical works at the pace it did (and frankly needs to do if it is to remain the great library it briefly was)

oddly, the public domain works which are not available are those which ARE being reissued by presses, one sees some "not really very corporate" corporate interference here (I mean by the presses)

what this is doing is putting some really odd attention on some of the worst writing by women pre-1922, and not some of the best

additionally, because the items are available in image, not text, they are not really very usable, and google books cannot replace internet archive/gutenberg or other text versions, or one needs to purchase adobe acrobat professional, which is costly

5.19.2009

An Afternoon Reading...
Sunday, May 24, 2009

at The Lounge at REDCAT
631 W. 2nd St.Los Angeles, CA

with

Amanda Ackerman
Marcia Arrieta
Deborah Meadows
&
Joseph Mosconi

FREE

Doors open at 2:00pm
Reading starts at 2:30pm

Amanda Ackerman lives in Los Angeles where she writes and teaches. She is
co-editor of the press eohippus labs. She is a member of UNFO (The
Unauthorized Narrative Freedom Organization) and writes as part of SAM OR
SAMANTHA YAMS. Her chapbook The Seasons Cemented is forthcoming from Hex
Presse, and her collaborative book Sin is to Celebration is forthcoming from
House Press. Her work has also been published or is forthcoming in flim
forum: A Sing Economy, String of Small Machines, The Physical Poets, WOMB,
Moonlit, Source Material: A Journal of Appropriated Text, and Area Sneaks.

Marcia Arrieta’s work has appeared in Blueprint Review, A capella
Zoo,Otoliths, So To Speak, 13th Moon, 88, The Bukowski Review, Poetry
Salzburg Review, Cold Mountain Review, Mipoesias, and others. Her Chapbook
experimental was published by potes & poets press; and her manuscript the
curve against the linear was chosen by Toadlily Press and published in their
Quartet Series—An Uncommon Accord. She edits and publishes Indefinite Space,
a poetry journal, now in its 18th year.

Deborah Meadows teaches in the Liberal Studies department at California
State Polytechnic University, Pomona. Her most recent book of poetry is from
Shearsman Press entitled Goodbye Tissues. Other works of poetry include:
involutia (Shearsman Press, UK, 2007), The Draped Universe (Belladonna*
Books, 2007), Thin Gloves (Green Integer, 2006), Representing Absence (Green
Integer, 2004), Itinerant Men (Krupskaya, 2004), and two chapbooks, Growing
Still (Tinfish Press, 2005) and “The 60’s and 70’s: from The Theory of
Subjectivity in Moby-Dick” (Tinfish Press, 2003). Her Electronic Poetry
Center author page is located: http://epc.buffalo.edu/authors/meadows/

Joseph Mosconi is a writer and linguist based in Los Angeles. He is
co-editor of the art & poetry journal Area Sneaks and is co-director of the
Poetic Research Bureau, a literary service in the public domain. His work
has appeared in Try, Shampoo, Triple Canopy, The Physical Poets vol. 2,
Primary Writing, the Fillip Review and other journals and magazines.
Five Points Reading: Not My Job (May 23, 7-10pm)
Events / News, Five Points Readings
Five Points Reading Series Presents: “Not my Job”
Saturday May 23rd, 2009 at 7pm
A night of serious diversion featuring:

John Chase
Jessica Hundley
Sarah Kessler
Tibby Rothman
Catherine Taft

5.17.2009

THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009
A CELEBRATION of LETTERS to the WORLD: POEMS from the WOM-PO LISTSERV

Featuring Kate Gale, Catherine Daly, Cati Porter and Ann Fisher-Wirth

Doors open 7 p.m. / Reading begins at 8 p.m.
$5 donation recommended.

Kate Gale is Managing Editor of Red Hen Press. Author of several poetry books including Mating Season and Fishers of Men, a novel and librettos, she received her PhD in literature from Claremont Graduate University and speaks widely on publishing, editing and writing. Her opera Rio de Sangre with composer Don Davis is being released as a world premiere at the Florentine Opera in Milwaukee in 2010.

Catherine Daly was one of the first WOM-PO members, and even acted as list webster for a while. She recently founded a women's prose listserv, WOMPROSE. Now author of eight books, including DaDaDa (Salt Publishing), Locket (Tupelo Press) and most recently VAUXHALL (Shearsman Books, 2008), she wrote the anthologized poem in front of the historic Frederick's of Hollywood about the first Lingerie Hall of Fame.

Cati Porter is the author of a chapbook, small fruit songs (Pudding House, 2008), and Seven Floors Up (Mayapple Press, 2008). Some of the journals where her poems and book reviews have appeared include Fringe, Rattle, Poetry Southeast, Umbrella, kaleidowhirl, and in the anthologies White Ink: Poems on Mothers and Motherhood, Letters to the World and Bedside Guide to No Tell Motel -- Second Floor. She is founder and editor of Poemeleon: A Journal of Poetry.

Ann Fisher-Wirth’s third book of poems, Carta Marina, appeared from Wings Press in April 2009. She is the author of Blue Window and Five Terraces and of the chapbooks The Trinket Poems and Walking Wu Wei’s Scroll. With Laura-Gray Street she is coediting Earth’s Body, an international anthology of ecopoetry in English. Her poems appear widely and have received numerous awards. She has had Fulbrights to Switzerland and Sweden. She teaches at the University of Mississippi.

101 West Fifth Street, Los Angeles, CA 90013 (corner of 5th and Main).
For a taste of the series, see our feature on www.poetry.la
Jim Henson's letter and number films for Sesame Street -- influence by DaDa, etc., "general in the culture"? -- and the resurgence of attention on abcedaria, acrostic, experimental film / letterforms, DaDa film, letter / dance, etc. in American gen x artists.