6.02.2004

under review -- newest book from University of Iowa Press about experimental poetry by women; this book (LYRIC INTERVENTIONS) thus far seems to dwell upon the "problem" or "anxieties" of American female experimental poets vis a vis lyricism -- such poets as Fraser and the Howes are separated from other (more male than female) language-oriented poets by their different negotiation with the lyric "I" and with the musical qualities of language. Thus far, the book seems to be focussed on the lyric "I" and *emotion* (seems dangrous, but the relationship to feminist poetry -- which almost completely excludes innovative feminist poetry -- is clear), and seems to be deaf to sound and blind to "visual lyricism" (while a great deal of both is in the poems -- but i've only read the intro and the chapters published elsewhere).

The author recently reviewed the other recent book about American female experimental writers by Elisabeth Frost in Kathleen Fraser's _HOW2_ (well, it is no longer edited by Fraser, and the book insists it is _HOW(2)_). Checked this. It is just inconsistent -- it is not always wrong. There is some other sloppy editing though

another "cut through" of the poets (other than lyric residue or tendency as a gendered chactaeristic / practice / value) is british female experimental poets (alto incl. Carol Ann Duffy) and identity -- other than that this "topic" includes the token post-colonial / non-white writer (not even primarily a poet!), it is unclear from the intro why issues of identity would be more marked in the UK than in the US. She says they are because the american vision of identity is more unitary, yet she also says she hopes to be doing an Aldon Neisen / Nathaniel Mackey on women's writing

still another section is the author falling back on her more familiar territory, which includes Guest, Fraser, and Monk

it is strange to see HOW2 in an echo chamber, espcially the Lola Ridge materials! Especially since Ridge is not a lyric poet, but a poet with a small lyric gift writing away from that towards larger more realistic / political poetry

No comments: