4.06.2009

two by ann candler, and a link to the book

ON THE DEATH OF A YOUNG LADY.
THRICE happy Maid! the awful scene is o'er;
And transitory ills are now no more:
To realms of bliss thy gentle spirit flies,
The cumbrous day in peaceful slumber lies.
No more, sweet Maid! wilt thou have cause to weep,
Nor grief with thee her midnight vigils keep.
By sickness worn, bow'd early to the tomb,
A fading flow'ret, wither'd in its bloom.
When death beheld thee youthful, fair, and good,
Then half disarm'd, irresolute he stood,
With seeming pity oft thy form survey'd,
No sudden change, no rapid strides he made;
Solemn and slow, protracted long the hour,
And long restrain'd his all subduing pow'r;
The stroke decisive, ling'ring, he deferr'd,
Yet ever found thee watching and prepar'd.
Myriads of bright immortals round thee wait,
And watch the moment that decides thy fate:
Behold, 'tis past:--thy tears are wip'd away:--
The gloom of night produces endless day.



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The task perform'd, the glorious prize is won,
The heav'nly host appears and guides thee on,
Presents thee spotless at the throne of grace,
Where thou behold'st thy maker face to face.
Thy shining robes in graceful order flow,
A never fading crown adorns thy brow;
Millions of winged seraphs, gather round:
Their golden harps thro' heav'n's wide portals sound,
While songs of thanks and praise united join:
O, bliss supreme!--their happy state is thine.
Thy well spent life, thy truth and innocence,
Faith bids us hope, has gain'd its recompence.
Instructed early on thy God to wait,
Adore his name, his wisdom venerate;
To gain instruction from the moral page,
And shun the follies of the present age;
With care avoid whate'er might taint the mind,
Corrupt the heart and leave a sting behind;
Inform'd where hidden danger lurking lay,
And how with safety to pursue thy way;
With guide marks set, that pointed out the road,
Life's mazy path securely hast thou trod:
Thy growing virtues mark'd thy years increase,
And crown'd thy days with happiness and peace:
Serene thou saw'st this hour approaching nigh,
Instructed how to live, and how to die.




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Page [27]

JULIA'S BRIDAL DAY,
AN ECLOGUE,
Addressed to a Young Lady on her Marriage.
"BRIGHT was the day, and warm the noon tide beam,*
"When wand'ring, to divert a leisure hour,
"A village maid, who loiter'd near the stream,
"Met her fair friend beneath an alder bow'r.


"There, on the verdant turf at ease reclin'd,
"They heard the soft'ned peal pass sweeping bye,
"Borne on the bosom of the summer wind,
"With many a mingled note of rural joy.


"The sprightly viol sounding in the shade,
"Responsive footsteps, shouts of loud applause,
"And mirth re-echo'd from the lowland glade:
"When thus the village maid enquir'd the cause."

LAURA.

What pleasing sounds are these I hear?
What joy those strains impart!
They breath enchantment o'er my ear,
And rapture o'er my heart.



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Page 28

MIRA.

When sounds like these such news repeat,
Such blest events proclaim,
Each breast, like thine, with joy must beat
And hail the voice of fame.

LAURA.

What fav'rite has the goddess found
To share her pageant car,
That airy regions echo round
And answer from afar?

MIRA.

Not envy sure can make you blind
To praise which merit warms:
What imperfection can you find
In JULIA'S matchless charms?

LAURA.

JULIA ! that name I must revere:
But say, what honour new?
Or why did fame so long defer
To pay the tribute due?

MIRA.

Hold, Laura; fame did, long ago,
Her matchless worth proclaim;
A blest occasion offers now
To speak her praise again.



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LAURA.

Say what can fortune offer more?
What greater bliss prepare?
Wit, sense, and beauty, wealth and pow'r,
Already crown the fair.

MIRA.

Kind heav'n, indulgent, now prepares
Her goodness to repay,
And fame, in these glad sounds, declares,
" 'Tis JULIA'S BRIDAL DAY ."

LAURA.

Say, is the youth who claims her care
Of known approved worth?
His merits equal to the fair,
Her equal too in birth?

MIRA.

A youth in whose descent we trace
High honor's just renown,
The offspring of an ancient race,
His worth their glory's crown.

LAURA.

Long may they live in blessed ease,
Untemper'd with alloy,
And tread the flow'ry paths of peace
With never ceasing joy.



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Page 30

MIRA.

Receive, kind Heav'n, my ardent pray'rs,
May they unrivall'd prove!
May each domestic bliss be theirs,
The fruits of peace and love!

LAURA.

Each rising morn that wish renew,
Each heart repeat the same,
And speak the praises justly due
To JULIA'S dear lov'd name.
* The three first stanzas of this Poem were supplied by a Friend of the Author.

http://digital.lib.ucdavis.edu/projects/bwrp/Works/CandAPoeti.htm

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