8.26.2007

alfred noyes was a british-to-america and back convert to catholicism, poet (wrote some obviously imagist-esque poems and a lot of ballad-like poems like THE HIGHWAYMAN) and editor of GOLDEN BOOK OF CATHOLIC POETRY

dedicated to the mother of a young priest who dies in a Japanese prison camp during wwii

the preface contrasts chaucer (of course all pre-reformation, post-pagan poetry in english being "catholic poetry") with dante, repeating the old stereotype of the "green leafy" fresh chaucer with the more serious, political and theological dante through whom more poetry has flowed, ...

noyes is of course firmly in the shakes was a catholic camp; also, the preface mentions tracing a catholic poetry less through poets who were catholic that the SYMBOL IN POETRY, though the best poems in the anthology, imo, are ballads

extremely problematic, especially in an anthology which was made in 1946, and especially in a volume of catholic poetry after world war 2 (Noyes wrote a great deal of war poetry -- wwi and ww2), that he mentions, re: the rosettis, "racially ... they had Catholicism in their blood..." but the conflation of RACE and RELIGION

so, there is then a section of people who were catholic because they were european christians, and there is a section of poets you have heard of, Aubrey De Vere, Coventry Patmore, Adelaide Proctor, Digby Mackworth Dolben, Katharine Tynan, Louise Imogen Guiney, Padraic Colum, James J. Daly, Dorothy Hobson, and then there is a section of noncatholics which perhaps listing may help me describe: spenser, donne, smart, wordsworth, tennyson, robert browning, the rosettis, wheelock...

so. first of all, although there are many translations, it seems that only translations by catholics were allowed, but the rosettis are catholics. layered on top of these few rosetti translations is an anthology of poetry in english with "catholic themes" from the british isles (mostly), an anthology which seems pretty broad ranging and seems to omit just blake and milton and elizabeth barrett browning and yeats and joyce, while including a few random nuns and priests that would not oridinarily be included

in an attempt to continue listing obscure female poets, here are the women in this anthology:

adelaide proctor
may probyn
emily h. hickey
katharine tynan hinkson
alice meynell
Sr. M. Dorothy Ann
louise imogen guiney
katherine bregy
blanche mary kelly
ellen gilbert
sr. mary immaculate
sr. mary helen
sr. m. madeleva
sr. m. genoveva
sr. m. philip
sr. m. john fredrick
mary e. mannix
sr. mary angelita, bvm
margery cannon
sr. maris stella
mary louise hector
dorothy hobson
sr. mary st. virginia

christina rossetti
caroline hazard
linda lyon van voorhis
victoria safelle johnson
belle cooper
alice cecelia cooper

of the poets included you may not have heard of, Margery Cannon, Ellen Gilbert, Sr. Mary St. Virginia, and Francis Sweeney were anthologised from individual poem publication in the catholic magazine AMERICA (still publishing). other journals used were Spirit and the Catholic Poetry Society of America and Catholic World. Additionally, poems by Wilfrid Meynell, Alice and Belle Cooper were included, but they are acknowledged as providing editorial assistance, and all of the sr. m. or sr. marys are members of the same order under Mother M. Rose Elizabeth.

uh, as usual, there are some florences and others I have to look up

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